More fluid drive info

I started researching an odd ball Nethercutt fluid drive for a Message Board member and came up with more washing machine fluid drives. Looks like they were used on Maytag, Amana and Simpson washing machines from the 1950s through the 1980s.

The top picture is a Simpson and the bottom is an Amana. These look a lot more like the engine mounted MK0 fluid drive than the Albion mounted MK1 fluid drives.

Obviously it is not the same casting but the size and fins appear to be very similar. I doubt there is a one way bearing also. These are also mounted as a driver the same as the MK0 instead of a driven like on the MK1s and MK2s. They are also available on Ebay at reasonable prices. One nice feature is that they are bolted together instead of welded together like all of my MK0 and MK1 fluid drives.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/23669-Speed-Queen-Washer-Fluid-Drive-Assembly-NEW-Old-Stock-From-late-1980s-OEM/333792016963

MK0 vs MK1 Handlebar Comparison

I believe the handlebars are from a BSA Bantam D1 and D3. They are still available new but the brazed on perches are a bit different on the new ones. MK0 on the right, MK1 on the left.

Both my MK1s and the MK0 have the same bars with English Doherty grips and twist throttle. I put a wider Aluminum bar on the Rust Bucket MK1 because I was riding it daily for awhile and the narrow BSA bars beat me up too much. I am trying to find a chrome plating shop. Eventually I want to get the Rust Bucket MK1 back to original.

More MK0/MK1 handlebar pics.

The kill switch is drilled and tapped on the left side of the MK0 bar and the same kill switch is clamped the right side of the MK1 bar.

Parking Brake

I know this is not original but I install parking brakes on all of our bikes due to the steep terrain we ride on. I first saw an improvised parking brake on a barn find MK4 auto bike about 15 years ago. I was able to identify it as an exhaust hanger o-ring from a Volvo P1800 2 seat sports car. The P1800 was built from 1961 to 1973 so at least the o-ring is period correct.

I store the o-ring on the left side since it falls off on the right side due to the throttle cable. The left side has the clutch lever. The brake lever is on the right.

I have been using these on our MK1s for years. The MK1s have the brake lever on the left. This really screws me up when I jump off the MK1 and onto the MK0.

I can store it on the left side with the brake lever on the MK1s.

I use a Yamahaha quad parking brake on our MK3 and MK4 bikes.

I retrofit the Yamahaha parking brake trinket to the original Magura brake lever on my MK8 bike.

U-joint installed

The u-joints were both worn out in my MK1s so this is the first functional example of an early u-joint I have come across. It has a grease fitting that is accessible through the fishmouth.

Here is the patent drawing showing the u-joint.

My collection of junk early u-joints. 2 came from my MK1s. Not sure how I got 2 more. None have provision for a grease fitting.

Gas cap

The old MK0 picture shows what looks like a quarter turn gas cap on the bike. This bike has what I suspect is a replacement MK2 gas tank because it has no green paint underneath the yellow and a fine thread MK2 plastic gas cap. I also suspect the original gas tank, wheels and muffler came from the 4a Maico bike which also shows a quarter turn gas cap. Since the fork was tweaked about 5 degrees from a misadventure it is not difficult to believe that the gas tank got damaged and was replaced at some point.

I am not sure why there are disk grinder marks all around the gas cap filler neck. I decided to look into a period correct replacement cap and came up with a late 1950’s Harley cap and filler bung that looks real close.

I took careful measurements and figured out what size hole saw to use. I turned down one of my old fine thread gas caps that I have been using as a painting mask to fit closely inside the hole saw. I also drilled a quarter inch pilot hole in the cap to help guide the hole saw. I screwed the modified cap to the filler neck.

Harley filler neck test fit.

Hole saw.

Ready to be brazed.